—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.
—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.

"I have heard that the more people come together, the more they can accomplish. That's why I decided to vote, to helpthe people in my community."

—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.

First generation Latino voter from El Salvador.

—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.
—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.

"My family has always been very civically minded. When I was younger, elections in Nicaragua were a very big deal, my family has always been involved. I never second guessed that I knew that voting was something important to do if you want to be a contributing member of society."

 

—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.

Second generation Latina voter from Nicaragua.

Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.
Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.

"Every vote counts so if I don't do anything then someone else may become president and that's not what I want, I need to make my voice be heard and I consider that's what voting is about. Letting people know, the country, this is what I want."

Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.

First generation Latina voter from Columbia.

—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.
—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.

"Even though I have been an American citizen for 10 years, I thought that I wasn't ready to vote because I didn't understand this country, politically speaking.  Now I feel more prepared and more serious about what my vote represents."

 

—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.

First generation Latino voter from Argentina.

—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.
—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.

"I decided to vote because I don't like the tone of voice of this gentleman. We're not here to take peoples' jobs. We're doing what Americans don't want to do. Most of us are honest people and we're here to work and support our families."

 

—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.

First generation Latino voter from El Salvador.

_90A5968.JPG
—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.
—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.
Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.
—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.
—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.
_90A5968.JPG
—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.

"I have heard that the more people come together, the more they can accomplish. That's why I decided to vote, to helpthe people in my community."

—Encarnacion Garcia Nieto, 78, Housekeeper.

First generation Latino voter from El Salvador.

—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.

"My family has always been very civically minded. When I was younger, elections in Nicaragua were a very big deal, my family has always been involved. I never second guessed that I knew that voting was something important to do if you want to be a contributing member of society."

 

—Elena Lacayo, 33, Musician.

Second generation Latina voter from Nicaragua.

Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.

"Every vote counts so if I don't do anything then someone else may become president and that's not what I want, I need to make my voice be heard and I consider that's what voting is about. Letting people know, the country, this is what I want."

Natalia Cover, 28, Nurse.

First generation Latina voter from Columbia.

—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.

"Even though I have been an American citizen for 10 years, I thought that I wasn't ready to vote because I didn't understand this country, politically speaking.  Now I feel more prepared and more serious about what my vote represents."

 

—Angel Gustavo Huapala, Chef and restaurant owner.

First generation Latino voter from Argentina.

—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.

"I decided to vote because I don't like the tone of voice of this gentleman. We're not here to take peoples' jobs. We're doing what Americans don't want to do. Most of us are honest people and we're here to work and support our families."

 

—David Hernandez, 53, General Maintenance Worker.

First generation Latino voter from El Salvador.

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